What a beautiful day on the Camino.

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Last night I stayed in Foncebedon, a tiny village in the mountains after Astorga. Because I was concerned about my ankles, I decided to taxi up the hill to give myself another rest day but still make some progress. I enjoyed sitting in the front seat conversing (barely) with the taxi driver, who was a Bono lookalike. He very graciously stopped to check that my trekking poles indeed made it in the trunk.

I got to Foncebedon early and hung out all day. It’s a tumble-down village of slate stone. Lots of it has fallen down or is in the process of falling down. It reminded me of the song our son played on the cello from the Suzuki method: “Moon over the Ruined Castle.”

But there are 4 Albergues which are bringing the village back to life. I stayed in Monte Imago, run by a small group of yoga enthusiasts. Their shared paella dinner was fantastic. And there was a cozy vibe. I slept straight through the night and didn’t hear any snoring.

This morning I had my pack transported to Acebo, about 10k away, to be conservative on the mileage. It’s still a little unnerving to hit the trail and know that my pack is sitting there at the place I’ve just left. It’s a good illustration of faith.

The pack transport firm, Jacotrans,hasn’t let me down yet—I put 7E in the envelope and write a destination, and it magically shows up further down the Camino.

So off I went in the fog, towards Cruz de Ferro, one of the landmarks of the Camino. It’s a cross on a tall pole around which pilgrims have left stones and momentos that symbolize what they would like to leave behind on the Camino, or something in memory of loved ones. And many other things in between. People bring stones from home and other small items. The fog

was so thick I didn’t see the Cross until it was right in front of me. I left a stone and said a prayer, though, I confess, the Cruz de Ferro did not move me as much as I expected. It was right on the road, not as isolated as I had pictured it.

The fog and sun made for beautiful light the next few hours. It was totally silent and there was a timeless feeling—I would not have been surprised to see people in medieval garb or even fairies.

I got to Acebo early, and my pack was there, but I wasn’t ready to quit for the day. So I repacked everything in the main pack and went on, another 10k . Ankles are doing well, and I felt so energized by the scenery and the experience of walking today.

The last 5k to Molinoseca were tough—all downhill on rocky ground, but I felt confident about continuing on to Molinaseca..

I’ve picked up a bit of a Camino tribe: the Hungarian sisters, the Finnish woman, Austrslians, and the 70 something siblings are here at the Albergue. I’m getting to like bunk bed life—as long as I get the lower bunk.

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Categories: Camino, Favorite Albergues, October 2013, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 6 Comments

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6 thoughts on “What a beautiful day on the Camino.

  1. Melanie Donahoe

    It is such a blessing to read your posts and see your AMAZING photos. You are sharing the gift of this pilgrimage with so many of us – thank you! May your ankles stay strong and blisters diminish. And may you continue to go with God.

    Like

  2. Lydia

    Wonderful photos; such a pleasure to “walk” with you.

    Like

  3. Melindaland

    The magic of fog is amazing, my favorite kind of weather! {Good thing I like it, given where I live and have lived…} Your photos are so evocative of the shrouding, muffling, cool, moistness of fog-walking filled with possibilities for surprises of all sorts. That huge pan of paella is positively mouth-watering, it must have helped give you the energy for a 20 k day. Go ankles, go Beth!

    Like

  4. George

    Hola, Beth. Feeling swept along with you by those pictures and your notes. Where can we find a map to follow you?

    Like

    • Hi George! Sorry I didn’t post a map on the blog before I left. It’s hard to maneuver posting one via the iPhone. Google Camino de Santiago and you will find lots of maps. I am on the Camino Frances, which means the route began in France.

      Like

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